Notice:   The Department of State and most embassies will close on Monday, January 21st in observance of the MLK, Jr. Holiday. Our offices will close locally at 1pm. Our call center will remain open for normal business hours.

China  - Expedited Visa Services

Visa to China
Expedited Visa Services

Our team can help you obtain your China Visa:


The article below provides important information about travel to China. For comprehensive Visa Application instructions, please see the specific Visa Requirements page for your Visa Type (business, tourist, etc). Our step-by-step instructions guide you through the process. We guarantee the accuracy of your application and expedite it with the appropriate Consulate. Our team is here to help with online chat, phone & email support.

06/22/2018 - Naturalized U.S. Citizens and/or U.S. Citizens with Dual Citizenship traveling to China


For those applying for Chinese visas within the jurisidiction of the Chinese Consulate in Los Angeles the following rules for Naturalized U.S. Citizens and for those who hold Dual Citizenship are now in effect. 


Naturalized U.S. Citizens and/or U.S. Citizens with Dual Citizenship traveling to China:
  • Dual Citizenship: If you currently have dual-citizenship, you must apply in-person. We cannot submit your Chinese visa application on your behalf. Please contact the Chinese Consualte in Los Angeles directly. 
  • Naturalized Citizens: If you became a U.S. Citizen through Naturalization, you must complete section 3.7 of the Chinese visa application and provide your prior non-U.S. passport or a signed letter stating that you nare o longer in possession of it.
  • Born outside the of the U.S.: If you are a U.S. citizen born overseas, you must complete section 3.7 of the Chinese visa application; whether or not you hold dual-citizenship.

09/16/2014 - Long term Travelers to China to Interview at DC Consulate


As of September 15, 2014, if you are intending to travel and stay in China for over 180 days and you belong to the Washington, D.C. jurisdiction, you will need to appear in person to the China Consulate in D.C. for a visa interview.
 
The following visa applicants to these China visa types must interview:
 
1) Employment/Work: Type Z
2) Student visa staying more than 180 days: Type X1
3) Visiting family members staying more than 180 days: Type Q1
4) Visiting foreigners working/studying in China, staying more than 180 days: Type S1
 
The following states are part of the Washington, D.C. jurisdiction of the China consulate:
Washington, D.C., Delaware, Idaho, Kentucky, Maryland, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wyoming.
 
As of right now, residents of other jurisdictions do not need to interview, but we will update you as information unfolds.
 
However, if you have any questions about this new Chinese visa policy, feel free to contact us at 1-888-596-6028 or email us at CustomerSupport@passportvisasexpress.com. Chat with our friendly representatives with our speedy chat program. The Chinese government has changed its policies numerous times over the past fifteen years, and we’ve kept abreast of them ever since. 

09/16/2014 - Alert: China Consulate to Accept Visa Applications Only from Within the US


If you are a US national (US passport holder), you were once able to apply for a China visa while you were traveling outside the United States. However, this has changed. The Chinese Consulate General has begun consistently rejecting applications that appear to indicate you have not reentered the United States.
 
In order to submit your China visa application successfully, you must leave China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, or Macau first, and then reenter the United States. Passport Visas Express.com can help you apply for your Chinese visa. It’s important that your US passport shows the stamps of your exit from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, or Macau, and then your stamp of entry to the United States.
 
If you have left China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, or Macau, and are not in the United States, you may also apply for a China visa from that country’s China consulate. For example, if you flew from China to Japan, then you may apply for a China visa from China’s consulate in Japan.
 
Unfortunately, if your Chinese visa application was rejected, Passport Visas Express.com will not be able to resubmit your visa application. Your options would be to return to the United States and apply in person, or to apply at the Chinese Consulate at the country of your stay.
 
Have any questions? Need help with your visa application to China? Call us at 1-888-596-6028 or email us at CustomerSupport@passportvisasexpress.com. We’ve had fifteen years’ of experience working with the Chinese embassy and can work with your schedule for regular or expedited service. 

08/19/2014 - Polio Vaccine Required for Travelers to China



As of August 1, 2015, travelers to China must meet a new requirement to deter the risk of polio. Upon entry, you must present Chinese officials a polio vaccine certificate that is valid within the past 12 months (1 year). If you do not have this certificate, a vaccine will be administered on site and a certificate issued for you. If you refuse to accept the vaccine, you will not be permitted entry.
 
This ruling applies to passport holders of these countries only: Afghanistan, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, and Syria. 
 
If you require a China visa, Passport Visas Express.com is here for you. Whether you go on pleasure or business, we can help turn a lengthy, red-tape-filled experience into a sure thing. Passport Visas Express.com has over fifteen years of experience with the Chinese consulate. A tremendous number of our clientele travel to China, so we know the script! For expedited service or any timing that suits your schedule, call us at 1-888-596-6028 or email us at CustomerSupport@passportvisasexpress.com. Chat with our friendly representatives with our speedy chat program!

01/27/2014 - China Consulate holiday closings 2014



Planning on traveling to China? Whether you’re a tourist or on business, your schedule will depend on the hours the Chinese embassy is open. Please note the Consulate General is closed on all US national holidays as well as Chinese holidays. These are all the dates the embassy is closed in 2014:
 
January 1, 20, 30, 31
February 17
May 1, 2, 26
July 4
August 1
September 1
October 1, 13
November 27, 28
December 25
 
Please plan your application accordingly. If you have any questions about what you need to attain your visa, feel free to contact our customer service at us 1-888-596-6028, or live chat with our friendly representatives. Passport Visas Express.com has experts ready to answer any question or help you deliver your visa or passport applications!

12/17/2013 - Chinese Consulate Holiday Closings



The Chinese Consulate in Chicago will be closed for Christmas on the 23rd thru the 25th and will re-open on the 26th.  They will close on New Year’s day, January 1st..
 
The Chinese Consulate in Los Angeles will close for Christmas on the 24th and 25th then re-o-pen on the 26th. They will also be closed on New Year’s day, January 1st.
 
The Chinese Consulate in New York will be closed the 24th and 25th, then re-open on the 26th.  We presume they will be closed on New Year’s day however this has not been confirmed as of yet.


10/25/2013 - You and the Canton Fair


or the next three weeks, one of the biggest trade fairs in China will be underway. The China Import and Export Fair, aka the Canton Fair, is held in Guangzhou and runs from October 15 to November 4. This must-see show is an ideal location for networking, taste-testing, and inspiring the mind. Last season’s fair hosted over 189,000 buyers and over 59,000 stands—buzzing with opportunities for deals and new connections.

To attend the Canton Fair, you must first obtain a Chinese visa before departing the USA. Your China visa will allow you to enter China and once you have arrived, you may register for a free entry badge/invitation to the fair itself. Need to get your China visa fast? Passport Visas Express.com is ready to get you to the Canton Fair post-haste with all your China visa needs. We offer expedited China visa application services in as fast as 2-business-day-turaround. Once your Chinese visa has been issued we’ll FedEx your passport back to you over night.

Some quick travel and schedule facts here: The venue will be China Import and Export Fair Complex, No. 380, Yuejiang Zhong Road, Guangzhou, China.

There will be three “phases,” or stages to the Canton Fair, all held in the International Pavilion:

Phase 1: October 15–19
Events are:
Electronics and household electrical appliances
Lighting equipment
Machinery
Building materials
Vehicles and spare parts
Hardware and tools
Chemical products
 

Phase 2: October 23–27
Events are:
Consumer goods
Home decorations
Gifts
 

Phase 3: October 31–November 4
Events are:
Office supplies
Cases and bags
Recreation products
Food
Textiles and garments
Shoes
Medicines, medical devices and health products
 
Ready to jump into the Canton Fair? Having trouble with your Chinese visa application? We have an exclusive new program called the Visa Pre-Check Service. We expertly review your China visa application to be sure it is in order prior to submission saving you time and giving you peace of mind. To get started, click here, or contact us 1-888-596-6028, use our friendly chat service, or email us at CustomerSupport@passportvisasexpress.com. We’ve been helping our customers successfully obtain a Chinese visa to visit the Canton Fair for over 15 years and are waiting to hear from you!

 

08/26/2013 - Chinese Visa Application Change



Effective September 1, 2013 the current Chinese Visa Application, "Form V.2011A" will be replaced by "Form V.2013". Important: the Chinese Embassy and Consulates are not accepting the new form until September 1, 2013- until then the old form must be used. We will post the new Chinese visa application on our website on Wednesday August 28th to minimize the impact the change in process will have on applicants. 


08/09/2013 - Need help with that China visa application?



It’s no secret that applying for a visa to China has become increasingly complex, and that your chances of having your Chinese visa application rejected or delayed are far greater than ever before. An omitted bit of information, poor choice of words, or simply attaching your passport photo incorrectly may cause your Chinese visa application to be rejected—you lose time and money spent on consular fees in the process—$180!

Here at Passport Visas Express.com, we offer an exclusive, premium service called the Visa Pre-Check Service. If you are having trouble or are pressed for time, we can help. Place an order and contact us—we can complete the Chinese visa application on your behalf. This will save you the time, money, and aggravation of completing the electronic China visa application form, and give you peace of mind.

Let our fifteen years’ of experience serve you! Contact us today. You can email us at CustomerSupport@passportvisasexpress.com, call us at 1-888-596-6028, or chat with our friendly online representatives today!

07/19/2013 - Traveling to China Is Easier Than You Think



Thanks to changes to China’s foreign policies, traveling to China has become easier and less expensive than ever before. The only thing that stands between you and your trip to the Great Wall is a visa. But never fear! While the China embassy’s visa application is a bit more complex, Passport Visas Express.comcan handle that part of the trip planning for you.

 
What makes for easier travel? A new website by the China National Tourist Offices, the US arm of government agency Chinese National Tourism Administration, introduces you to historical sites—the terra cotta warrior excavation, Beijing, stops along the Silk Road, ancient palaces—and helpful information on where to travel for fine food, natural habitats, shopping, and hotels, both deluxe and best bang-for-your-buck stays.

 
This site provides a one-stop guide for anyone interested in a little research or some serious planning, with phone numbers and email addresses to reach the vendors you’re interested in.


If you’re thinking about flights, here are some quick figures from Air China, which has promotional prices. Note these prices, which are quoted during peak tourist season: You can fly from Los Angeles, CA, to Beijing for all $920; or from New York to Hong Kong for $1,084. There are now direct flights from Houston, TX, as well.


But what’s left? The visa. Check out our other pages on different types of visa and see which applies to you. If you’re interested in visiting Hong Kong, our handy guide will give you all the information you need on what the visa requirements are. Have any questions on visas for a whole group of people, or how to update everyone’s visas en masse? Our friendly customer service is happy to answer any and all questions at 1-888-596-6028, or email us at CustomerSupport@passportvisasexpress.com.


Leave the busy work of a visa application to us and enjoy the nature, culture, and glamour of China yourself! 

09/14/2012 - China Visa Types



China Visa Types

All US passport holders must apply for a visa in order to enter China. The overseas Chinese visa authorities are Chinese embassies, consulates, and other offices authorized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China. If a you intend to enter into, exit from or transit through Chinese territory, you must apply for a Chinese visa to the above-mentioned Chinese visa authorities.

Passport Visas Express is happy to assist you in sorting through the type of visa you require as well as in applying and processing this visa for you. We have a variety of informational pages and a host of experts to walk you through your planning!

There are four general types of visas: diplomatic, courtesy, service, and ordinary. Ordinary visas are organized by letter types, as follows. Please click on the name of the visa for more information on requirements, lengths of stay, and how to apply.  

Ordinary visas

Tourist visa (L)

This visa is for tourists, travelers visiting family in China, or for other personal reasons. If you’re taking a cruise that stops in mainland China, this is the visa for you—check out our page on cruising to and around China.

Business visa (F)

This visa is for those invited into China to engage in business, attend lectures and conferences or any exchange on sciences, culture, technology, conduct research, and for internships. If you are a journalist, see below for the J-2 visa.

Work visa (Z)

This visa is for those to be employed in China, as well as to his or her family members. This includes teachers. If you are a journalist, see below for the J-1 visa.

Student visa (X)

This visa is issued to students as well as those intending to study or intern in China for more than 6 months.

Transit visa (G)

If you are passing through China on the way to another country, and your stay in China will be over 24 hours, you must have a G visa. You will also need this if you intend on leaving the airport, regardless of the length of your stay.  

Crew visa (C)

This visa is intended for crew members who work on international trains, airlines, or any such vessel, as well as for his or her family members.

Journalist resident visa (J-1)

If you are a journalist or correspondent staying in China long-term, you are required to have the J-1 visa.

Journalist foreigner visa (J-2)

If you are a journalist or correspondent staying in China for temporary coverage or short-term assignments, you are required to have a J-2 visa.

Permanent resident visa (D)

This visa is issued to those seeking to reside permanently in China.


Diplomatic visa

Apply for a diplomatic visa with us here.


Group visa

Group visas are available to tourists traveling in groups of five or more. This group must arrive, stay, and depart together—please check our page here on more details.  


Visa-free entry into China

There are a few minor exceptions to requiring a visa to China, as follows:

1. Singapore, Brunei, and Japan passport holders are exempt from needing a visa for visits of up to 15 days, for business, touring, or visiting family and friends.

2. Those in transit, for example, in a flight layover in China, are permitted to stay for under 24 hours and must stay in the airport. Detailed information is here.

3. Those in transit at the Pudong Airport or Hongqiao Airport of Shanghai, provided they hold valid passports, visas for the onward countries, final destination tickets and have booked seats, and stay in Shanghai for less than 48 hours. These must be passport holders from Republic of Korea, United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, France, Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Austria, Greece, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Iceland.

Need help deciding what you need? Need help with your application? Help yourself by letting us help you! We will review your application, deliver it to the embassy, and mail you your new visa in the time that works for you. Check out our site, call our friendly customer service at 1-888-596-6028, or chat with our representatives! Then spend the rest of your time thinking about what you can do in China, and leave the hows to us!

 

 

09/11/2012 - Trade Shows in China, Fall 2012



Going to a trade fair in China this fall? There are literally dozens of shows and exhibitions, ranging from pets, jazz, to sports, fine arts, and green energy. They’re scattered across metropolises Hong Kong, Guangzhou (Canton), Beijing, and Shenzhen, and to attend these, all you need is curiosity and a visa.
 
Here’s a short sampling of all that China’s shows have to offer you:
 
Fine Art Asia 2012: October 4–7, in Hong Kong
            The Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre hosts a premiere art fair of museum-quality art and antiques from the Far East and West. This year’s fair will feature Qing Dynasty glass, ancient Chinese embroidery, jades, lacquers, and porcelain tea sets, to name a few. Jewelry and watches from Tiffany, Cartier, and Bulgari are also displayed along these ancient arts.
 
Music: October 11–14, in Shanghai
            Attend master classes on the traditional Chinese instrument zither or a jazz workshop at the Shanghai New International Expo Centre (SNIEC), or browse top-class vendors for pianos, saxophones, drums, violins, as well as electronic instruments. This huge show hosted over 50,000 visitors last year!
 
Pet Fair Asia 2012: October 11–14, in Shanghai
            Meet and greet other fans of cats, dogs, birds, fish, and whoever else! at the Pet Fair in the Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center. Exhibits range from pet food to training equipment to aquariums to social networking tools for your pet association or business. Note that there is a Professional Trade Day on October 11–12, and a Public Open Day October 13–14, so be sure to choose which is suitable for you.
 
BIT’s First Annual World Congress of GreenAuto: October 19–21, in Guangzhou
            The second Low Carbon Energy Summit (the first being in Geneva), this convention is focused on the cultivating and brainstorming on practical solutions to sustainable energy use for “New Energy Vehicles.” Forums run through the schedule, with panelists from academics to gas/petrol company CEOs. This think-tank, bright-eyed event takes place at the Guangzhou Baiyun International Convention Center.
 
Top Shoes & Fashion Accessories: October 24–26, in Beijing
            Doubled in size from last year, this event features upcoming international fashion trends, with a special focus on Brazil’s rising prominence, with runway shows and exhibits of the newest styles, from Italy, France, Taiwan, and Brazil. This event is concurrent with China’s Fashion Week, for an exciting weeklong chance to explore the coming looks of 2013, at the China National Convention Center.
 
Kaohsiung International Food Show: November 1–4, Kaohsiung City
            This Taiwanese trade fair caters to wine tasters, seafood fans, coffee fanatics, and all scales of eating, whether in restaurants or markets, fresh or frozen. This is almost a secret event—until now, flocked to mostly by locals. Be sure to sample dumplings, thousand-year eggs, a variety of soy sauces and chilies, and candies. Alongside food is interest in food presentation and business networking.
 
Asia Golf Show 2012: November 30 to December 2, in Shenzhen
            At the Shenzhen Convention & Exhibition Center, this annual pan-Asian event hosts conferences on golf education, networking and trading, and the newest golf equipment to play with. The PGA of America, Great Britain and Ireland are among participants in a PGA Teaching and Coaching Summit Seminar that is the convention’s central event.
 
To sample these trade shows, it’s most likely that the only visa you need is a tourist visa, called an L visa. However, the Chinese embassy may also see it fit to issue you a business visa, called an F visa, appropriate for short-term visits. There is no apparent rhyme or reason to this, so it’s difficult to anticipate which visa you will be required to have. Check out our country info page for a list of visa types as set by the Chinese embassy.
 
With this in mind, let Passport Visas Express make it easy for you by processing whatever visa you need for you. Our experts are well versed with expectations and guidelines of the Chinese embassy and will work hard to meet your needs with your time table. 

08/05/2012 - Changes to China's visa policy effect travelers



Big changes arrive in China’s visa policies, for both tourists and business travelers, effective August 1, 2012. If this is your first time traveling to China, it may be daunting to know that there are many visa types, depending on if you’re a tourist, student, professional, or businessperson. We have each visa type listed here. However, those familiar with current policies should know there are new requirements set by the Embassy of China:
If you are a tourist, you are required to provide one of these:
1.     A copy of your round-trip airplane ticket and hotel reservation;
2.     A copy of your itinerary that includes your name and information;
3.     An invitation letter from a Chinese institution, business entity, or individual (if the latter, you must include a copy of this individual’s ID).
If you travel on business, you are now required to provide a letter of invitation issued by the local Chinese government, institution, or business entity, or by an  authorized Chinese agency.   
Good news for business travelers who require a shorter stay in China: the employment Z-visa is now valid for a minimum for 3 months (90 days) rather than 6 months (180 days). This permits travelers arriving on business F-visas to apply for Z-visas should they need a few more weeks in China, rather than have to leave the country in order to renew. Prior to this, typical F-visa holders could stay only 1 month per entry into China, and were required to depart in order to return for another month. 
For more details on business travel to China under these new requirements, please see here [[link https://www.passportvisasexpress.com/visa_services/china/china_san_francisco_consulate/business_visa]].
This comes with stricter policies on illegal overstays of visas, entries, and employment, however. The Chinese government intends to enforce a new law called the Exit-Entry Administration, effective July 1, 2013. This law includes penalties given to travelers who
  1. who enter China without the correct visa;
  2. stay without a valid visa;
  3. enter and stay illegally without valid ID;
  4. work illegally.
In turn, employers in China will be penalized for
1.     offering work to those without a valid work permit;
2.     using falsified documents for applications or falsified data in invitation letters.
Please note that penalties range from detention for up to 15 days, deportation, or fines for $350–$3,200.
Knowledge is power, especially when traveling! Keep up to date with Passport Visas Express. Our experts are well versed with the Embassy of China’s new policies. Allow us to work with you to accommodate any of your traveling needs, whether for pleasure or work.
  

09/28/2010 - China National Day 2010



People's Republic of China

Please Note: The Embassy of the People's Republic of China will be closed on September 30th & October 1st in observance of China's National Day. Please plan your processing time accordingly. See the 2010 Embassy closing schedule.
 

07/21/2009 - China Closed


Please note the Chinese Embassy will be closed on July 27th and 28th for a special event. Please plan your processing time accordingly. 

05/07/2009 - Chinese Embassy Closing


May 7th: The Chinese Embassy in Washington, DC has just announced it will be closed tomorrow, Friday May 8th. No reason was given.

11/24/2008 - Chinese Group Visa


Chinese Group Visa

 

Updated: 011/2008

 

 

What is a Chinese Group Visa:

 

1.  The Chinese  Group  Visa is issued to a tourist group organized by a travel agency which comprises at least five (5) members who must travel together both in and out of China.

 

2.  The Tourist Group  Visa is issued on a Group Tourist Form (a manifest is created by the Chinese Embassy) instead of on the individual passport as a visa is normally issued.

 

 

 

Documents to be included with the visa application:

 

1.  Visa Notification from any head office of the China Travel Service (CTS), China International Travel Service(CITS), or China Youth Travel Service (CYTS), or Chinese National Tourist Bureau, or any Chinese provincial Tourist Bureau.

 

2.  Completed Tourist Group Visa Form in triplicate. If there is any blank left on the name list, draw a straight line from the left corner down to the right corner in blue or black ink.

 

3.  Original passports which have been arranged in an order which is consistent with that appearing on the Group Tourist Visa Form.

 

 

Limitations of the Chinese Group Visa: 

There are limitations to the group visa that need to be seriously considered. The group visa provides no flexibility: since the visa is issued to the entire group any changes such as one of the travelers not being able to travel at the last minute would invalidate the visa and a new visa would need to be issued to the group before departure from the USA. The group visa also does not allow an individual who may want to stay longer or who has a slightly different itinerary to travel independently of the group. All must arrive, stay together and depart together.

 

The Chinese Embassy does not recommend this type of visa. Instead they recommend each person obtain a tourist visa which will allow them to travel independently as well as part of a group.

 

How to apply:

 

Please contact us so that we can provide you with the application, requirements and fees. Please write "Chinese Group Visa" in the subject field of your email.

 


Processing time and Application fees:

 

1.  Consular fees are $110 per person for American passport holders and $24 for non-American passport holders. Services fees are based on the number of applicants in the group. Please request a quote.

 

2.  The regular processing time is 5 working days. For express service, additional consular fees of $15 per person for 1 working day processing, or $10 per person for 2-3 working days processing will be charged.



11/13/2008 - Chinese Visa Types


  A Brief Introduction to Chinese Visas

 

A Chinese visa is a permit issued by the Chinese visa authorities to an alien for entry into, exit from or transit through China. The Chinese visa authorities may issue a Diplomatic, Courtesy, Official or Regular Visa to an alien according to his/her status, purpose of visit to China or passport type.

 

The overseas Chinese visa authorities are Chinese embassies, consulates, and other offices authorized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China. If a foreigner intends to enter into, exit from or transit through Chinese territory, he/she shall apply for a Chinese visa to the above-mentioned Chinese visa authorities.

 

*Visa-free entry into China

 

  1.Visa-free entry for visitors: No visa is required for ordinary passport holders from Singapore ,Brunei and Japan to visit China for up to 15 days for business, sightseeing, visiting relatives and friends or transit.
 

 

2.Visa-free transit (click for more information)
 

 

*Visas are not required of aliens who hold air tickets to the final destination and have booked seats on international airliners flying directly through China, and will stay in a transit city for less than 24 hours without leaving the airport.
 

 

*Visas are not required of passport holders of the following countries, who transit through Pudong Airport or Hongqiao Airport of Shanghai, provided they hold valid passports, visas for the onward countries, final destination tickets and have booked seats, and stay in Shanghai for less than 48 hours:

 

Republic of Korea, United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, France, Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Austria, Greece, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Iceland.

 

 

*Classification of Regular Visa

Regular Visas consist of eight sub-categories, which are respectively marked with Chinese phonetic letters C, D, F, G, J-1, J-2, L, X and Z.

 

If you need assistance applying for a Chinese Visa please click on the type of visa you need:

 

C Visa: Issued to crewmembers to perform duties on board an international train, airliner or other vessel, and their accompanying family members.

 

D Visa: Issued to an alien who comes to reside permanently in China.

 

F Visa: Issued to an alien who is invited to China for a visit, an investigation, a lecture, to do business, scientific-technological and culture exchanges, short-term advanced studies or internship for a period of no more than six months.

 

G Visa: Issued to an alien who transits through China.

 

J-1 Visa: Issued to foreign resident correspondents in China.

 

J-2 Visa: Issued to foreign journalists who make short trips to China on reporting tasks.

 

L Visa: Issued to an alien who comes to China for sightseeing, family visiting or other private purposes.

 

X Visa: Issued to an alien who comes to China for study, advanced studies or internship for a period of more than six months.

 

Z Visa: Issued to an alien who comes to China for a post or employment, and his or her accompanying family members.

 

If you need assistance applying for your visa please click here.

08/18/2008 - Chinese Transit Visa


Chinese Transit (G) Visa

 

The main difference between a Chinese transit visa and a Chinese tourist visa is the validity of the visa.

 

A Chinese transit visa is valid for 7 days. To apply you would send your passport, a passport photo, visa application and a copy of your itinerary indicating the dates of transit through China.

 

A Chinese tourist visa is typically being issued for 6 months validity with a stay of 30 days. The requirements are the same as the Chinese Tranist visa except in addition you would need to submit a copy of your Hotel Reservation.

 

The fee is the same for both the Chinese Tranist visa and the Chinese Tourist Visa.

 

We highly recommend you apply for a Tourist visa for the flexibility is provides.
 

 

  Who needs a Chinese Transit Visa? 

 

Chinese Transit Visa (G Visa) is issued to an alien who transits through China. Visas are not required in the following circumstances:

 

1.Visa-free entry for visitors:

 

No visa is required for ordinary passport holders from Singapore, Brunei and Japan to visit China for up to 15 days for business, sightseeing, visiting relatives and friends or transit.

 

2.Visa-free transit:

 

*Visas are not required of aliens who hold air tickets to the final destination and have booked seats on international airliners flying directly through China, and will stay in a transit city for less than 24 hours without leaving the airport.

 

*Visas are not required of passport holders of the following countries, who transit through Pudong Airport or Hongqiao Airport of Shanghai, provided they hold valid passports, visas for the onward countries, final destination tickets and have booked seats, and stay in Shanghai for less than 48 hours:

 

Republic of Korea, United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, France, Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Austria, Greece, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Iceland.




If you need assistance applying for a Chinese Transit Visa please click the link below and select Tourist visa- the application process is exactly the same.  Chinese Transit Visa




07/23/2008 - China Invitation Letter


June 27, 2008

 

Re: Chinese Business Visa Invitation Letter / Visa Notification


The Chinese Government has reinstated the need for applicants traveling to China for business purposes to present a Letter of Invitation (LOI) or Visa Notification along with the rest of the application documents when applying for a business visa.

 

Passport Visa Express.com has established a relationship with a Chinese Organization that can obtain a Letter of Invitation in 3 or 5 business days (in many cases faster). The organization is fully licensed and accredited by the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs and is recognized by all Chinese Embassies and consulates around the world. The service is now on our website: Chinese Invitation  Letter

 

Currently we are able to obtain single entry Letter of Invitation, 30 day stay, valid 90 days. We hope to offer multiple entry Letter of Invitation with 6 and 12 month validity shortly. To apply for the Letter of Invitation we need a scanned copy of the applicant's passport plus the name of the company they work for and their position with the company.

 

If you are interested in providing Letter of Invitation to your customers or clients please email us. 

07/01/2008 - Changes to Chinese Visa Requirements


Starting April 15th, the Embassy of China is adding more documents to their list of visa requirements. Generally, these documents are proof of travel (copy of round-trip travel itinerary or airline tickets) and proof of hotel reservation while in China. These new requirements have been added to the regular list of requirements in the Chinese visa area of our website.

06/27/2008 - China Visa: Itinerary


If applying for a Chinese visa using 1 business day processing your itinerary or tickets must show an international departure date within 1 week of your Chinese visa application submission.

06/03/2008 - China Visa Fee Increase


Beginning August 1, 2007 the Chinese visa application fee will increase from $50.00 to $100.00 for all visa types regardless of the number of entries. Expedite fees will remain the same. Please visit our China visa page for more details.

06/02/2008 - China Holiday Closings


The Chinese Embassy will be closed Friday, May 30th, 2008 for an official holiday. Please choose your processing times accordingly.

06/02/2008 - Chinese Transit Visa


Visas are required to transit China.  Persons transiting China on the way to and from Mongolia or North Korea or who plan to re-enter from the Hong Kong or Macau Special Administrative Regions should be sure to obtain visas allowing multiple entries.  Permits are required to visit Tibet as well as many remote areas not normally open to foreigners.  Every foreigner going to Tibet needs to get a travel permit which can be done through local travel agents. Permits cost approximately RMB 100, are single-entry and valid for at most three months.  Most areas in Tibet are not open for foreigners except Lhasa City and part of Shan Nan.  Foreigners can be fined up to RMB 500, taken into custody, and removed for visiting restricted areas. Americans traveling in Asia have been able to obtain visas to enter China from the Chinese visa office in Hong Kong and the Embassy of China in Seoul, South Korea.

 

In July 2007, the Chinese government tightened its regulations for altering or renewing visas for foreigners already in China.  Visitors can no longer change tourist (L) and exchange (F) -type visas to other types and many applications must now be completed in person.  There have also been reports that entry and exit violations are being more strictly enforced, with recent reports of police, school administrators and hotel staff checking to ensure that foreigners have not overstayed their visas.

 

Americans who overstay or otherwise violate the terms of their Chinese visas will be subject to a maximum fine of 5,000 RMB and departure delays and may be subject to detention.  Travelers should note that international flights departing China are routinely overbooked, making reconfirmation of departure reservations and early airport check-in essential.  An airport user fee for both international and domestic flights are now included in the cost of the ticket price.

06/02/2008 - Chinese Visa


ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:  A valid passport and visa are required to enter China and must be obtained from Chinese Embassies and Consulates before traveling to China.  Americans arriving without valid passports and the appropriate Chinese visa are not permitted to enter and will be subject to a fine and immediate deportation at the traveler's expense.  Travelers should not rely on Chinese host organizations claiming to be able to arrange a visa upon arrival.  Chinese authorities have recently tightened their visa issuance policy, in some cases requiring personal interviews of American citizens. Although a bilateral United States-China agreement provides for issuance of multiple entry visas with validity of up to one year for tourists and business visitors, Chinese consulates often limit visas to only one-entry.

06/02/2008 - China Travel Alert


This Travel Alert is being issued to alert U.S. citizens to safety and security concerns in China's Tibetan Autonomous Region (TAR). On March 14, violence erupted following peaceful demonstrations in the city of Lhasa. American citizens in Tibet and especially in Lhasa are advised to avoid areas where demonstrations are taking place. U.S. citizens in Lhasa should seek safe havens in hotels and other buildings and remain indoors to the extent possible. Americans are advised to defer travel to Tibet at this time. This Travel Alert expires on April 14, 2008.

 

The Embassy has received reports from American citizens in the city who report gunfire, rioting, and other violence. Information from the media and other sources about the extent of the violence may be sporadic. American consular personnel have not yet been granted access to the TAR and therefore assistance to American citizens may be limited. U.S. citizens in Lhasa should avoid unnecessary movement within the city until the situation stabilizes.

 

For the latest security information, Americans living and traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs Internet web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Worldwide Caution, Travel Alerts, and Travel Warnings can be found. Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. or Canada, or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

 

The U.S. Embassy in Beijing can be reached 24 hours per day at 86-10-6532-3431. The addresses and telephone contact information for the U.S. Embassy and Consulates are at the bottom of this announcement.

 

U.S. citizens residing or traveling in China are reminded to register with the U.S. Embassy or closest U.S. Consulate by entering your travel itinerary and contact information at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/home.asp. In case of difficulties registering online, please contact the closest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

 

U.S. citizens residing or traveling in China are reminded to register with the U.S. Embassy or closest U.S. Consulate by entering your travel itinerary and contact information at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/home.asp. In case of difficulties registering online, please contact the closest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

 

U.S. Embassy Beijing: tel. 86-10-6532-3431

 

U.S. Consulate General Chengdu: tel. 86-28-8558-3992

 

U.S. Consulate General Guangzhou: tel. 86-20-8518-7605

 

U.S. Consulate General Shanghai: tel. 86-21-3217-4650

 

U.S. Consulate General Shenyang: tel. 86-24-2322-1198


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